Tribal Enrollment

We assist applicants in becoming Tribally enrolled. We can also help Tribal offices in processing applications and providing Tribal membership cards. If you would like to contact a Tribe, we can provide you with a list of addresses and phone numbers for Tribes in the TCC region.

Tribal Membership Documents & Info

Tribal Enrollment FAQ’s

    • I am already a shareholder in Doyon, Limited, isn’t that good enough? 
      • Many people confuse tribal membership with being a shareholder in an Alaska Native Regional Corporation. A Regional Corporation such as Doyon, Limited operates under state corporate law to make money for its shareholders. A tribe is a sovereign (self-governing) entity that is federally recognized and operates on a government-to-government basis with state and federal governments. Tribes operate programs to benefit their membership.
    • What is Tribal membership?
      • In Alaska, tribal membership refers to being a member of a federally recognized tribe. There are 229 federally recognized tribes in Alaska, 37 of which are in the TCC region. Some tribes use the term citizenship because the tribes operate as a government.
    • Why should I be Tribally enrolled? 
      • Proof of tribal membership is required for many services that might be available to those of Alaska Native heritage (Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts). Some examples are childcare assistance for working parents, to register at an Indian Health Service Clinic or educational grants or scholarships.
    • How do I become Tribally enrolled? 
      • One can apply to the tribe of one’s parents or ancestors. In Alaska, the tribe is in the village where the relatives are from.
    • Can I be enrolled to more than one Tribe? 
      • Sometimes. Some tribes in the Tanana Chiefs Conference region allow dual enrollment. Most but not all tribes allow dual enrollment for minor children under the age of eighteen if they’re eligible to be enrolled to both tribes.
    • Is there a minimum Alaska Native blood requirement for Tribal membership in Tribes in the TCC region?
      • Most tribes in the TCC region do not have a minimum Native blood requirement, although the trend is leaning toward adding a minimum degree of Native blood as a requirement.
    • What paperwork is required to be submitted with the application for tribal membership? 
      • To prove lineal descent from a member of the tribe an original or certified copy of an original birth certificate is the preferred proof of parentage. An original baptismal record is also acceptable proof of parentage. Adoption paperwork is also required in adoption situations.
    • Is having a CIB card sufficient proof to participate in programs?
      • A CIB card is a certificate of degree of Indian blood, available from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. To participate in some programs a CIB card is all one needs if the only requirement is to show Alaska Native or American Indian heritage. An example of this is an after school program intended specifically for Indian children. In other situations, proof of ribal membership is mandatory, i.e. for childcare assistance.
    • How long does it take to get a response once an application has been sent to the TCC tribal enrollment office?
      •  Tribes review applications for membership at monthly tribal council meetings, so it depends on when the council office receives the applications. Response time varies from one month to several months.
    • What tribes does TCC’s Tribal enrollment office provide services for?
      • Allakaket
      • Anvik
      • Beaver
      • Birch Creek
      • Dot Lake
      • Eagle
      • Grayling
      • Holy Cross
      • Hughes
      • Huslia
      • Koyukuk
      • Minto
      • Nenana
      • Nikolai
      • Rampart
      • Ruby
      • Shageluk
      • Stevens Village
      • Takotna
      • Tetlin