Advocacy

For the past 100 years, TCC has been shaping Federal Indian Policy and Tribal-State relations through powerful joint advocacy.   This site is to provide up to date information on current advocacy issues which will empower Alaska Native tribes and tribal members.  Only unified together, are we able to craft the laws and policies which impact our people.

Our Senior Managers, Executive Board, Staff, and Legal Counsel stay current on events and are happy to speak with interested individuals.

Natural Resources

ChinookSalmon



Our lands, waters, animals and fish are at the heart of our cultural and spiritual well-being. Every year legislation at all levels of government is introduced that can affect the strength of our Native voice. Meaningful participation in Federal and State regulatory and agency processes will help to ensure adequate protection for Alaska Native Natural Resources.

Education

Sovereignty & Justice

Sovereignty



Those powers lawfully vested in a tribe are not, in general, delegated powers granted by Congress, but rather inherent powers of a limited sovereignty which has never been extinguished. Through our own tribal government resolutions and being a diligent watchdog of the governments that have responsibilities to us, TCC seeks to protect and expand both inherent and delegated tribal authority.

Health

Sovereignty



TCC advocates for the improvement and expansion of health and wellness services to its shareholders through partnerships with various state and federal agencies. Legislation in this area can be cumbersome. However, there are plenty of opportunities to get involved in making an impact in the wellness of our community.

Native Vote

vote



“We the Indian People must be governed by principles in a democratic manner with the right to choose our way of life. Since our Indian culture is threatened by the presumption of being absorbed by the American society we believe we have the responsibility of preserving our precious heritage. We believe that Indians must provide the adjustment and thus freely advance with dignity to a better life.” excerpt from The Declaration of Indian Purpose.

Despite this call to arms to protect our way of life, one in three eligible Native voters in Alaska remains unregistered. If all Native people voted during a normal turnout year, approximately 25% of the electorate at the polls would be Native. This voting bloc could be more powerful than the Republican, Democratic and non-partisan vote. What are we waiting for?